If you don't have a steady flow of leads, you won’t have any deals to close. 

So even if you are the best sales professional on the planet, without leads, you’re toast. 

How do you get more leads? Leads that are good? Leads that have a good chance of closing?

Great question….hopefully this short review of Seth Godin’s book will help. 

Much of Godin’s book “All Marketers are Liars Tell Stories” has a strong focus on a B2C model. However, even in the B2B model, your customers are STILL consumers. They consume your message, they consume your services, they consume the experience of buying (or not buying) your product or service. 

First, a few of my favorite quotes from the book:

  • “Successful marketers are just the providers of stories that consumers choose to believe.”

  • “We believe what we want to believe, and once we believe something, it becomes a self-fulfilling truth. If you think that more expensive wine is better, then it is. If you think your new boss is going to be more effective, then she will be.”

  • “The facts are irrelevant. In the short run, it doesn’t matter one bit whether something is actually better or faster or more efficient. What matters is what the consumer believes.”

Before we get to Godin’s marketing process, we need to cover two definitions: Worldview and Frames.

Worldview:

Worldview refers to the rules, values, beliefs and biases that a consumer brings to a situation. If Jason had a terrible experience the last time he bought a car from a used-car salesman, his worldview when he visits a dealership four years later is different than that of someone who is buying her third car in four years from the same place.

Frames: 

Frames are elements of a story painted to leverage the worldview a consumer already has. Krispy Kreme did it with the phrase Hot Donuts. Hot means fresh and sensual and decadent. Pile that onto the way some of us feel about donuts and they had tapped into an existing worldview (donuts = sensual = hot = love). It wouldn’t work on everyone, but until people changed their worldview (donuts = carbs = get fat), they did great. 

 
 Photo credit: The War on Mind and Body

Photo credit: The War on Mind and Body

 

One more important note from Godin before moving on:

Don’t try to change someone’s worldview is the strategy smart marketers follow. Don’t try to use facts to prove your case and to insist that people change their biases. You don’t have enough time and you don’t have enough money. Instead, identify a population with a certain worldview, frame your story in terms of that worldview and you win.”

Finally, here is Godin's 5 step process to analyze before you run your next marketing campaign:

STEP 1: THEIR WORLDVIEW AND FRAMES GOT THERE BEFORE YOU DID 

A consumer’s worldview affects the way he notices things and understands them. If a story is framed in terms of that worldview, he’s more likely to believe it. 

STEP 2: PEOPLE ONLY NOTICE THE NEW AND THEN MAKE A GUESS 

Consumers notice something only when it changes. 

STEP 3: FIRST IMPRESSIONS START THE STORY 

A first impression causes the consumer to make a very quick, permanent judgment about what he was just exposed to. So be very careful to make sure your first impression is a great one. 

STEP 4: GREAT MARKETERS TELL STORIES WE BELIEVE 

The marketer tells a story about what the consumer notices. The story changes the way the consumer experiences the product or service and he tells himself a lie. Consumers make a prediction about what will happen next. Consumers rationalize anything that doesn’t match that prediction. 

Marketing is now so well developed and so embedded in our culture that consumers no longer make decisions based on a rational analysis of facts. Instead they decide based on the stories they’re told.

STEP 5: MARKETERS WITH AUTHENTICITY THRIVE 

The authenticity of the story determines whether it will survive scrutiny long enough for the consumer to tell the story to other people. Sometimes marketing is so powerful it can actually change the worldview of someone who experiences it, but no marketing succeeds if it can’t find an audience that already wants to believe the story being told.

Consumers are all different, but ultimately they all want the same outcome. They want to be promoted, to be popular, to be healthy, wealthy and wise. They want to be pleasantly surprised and honestly flattered.

Finally, from an author that spent 220 pages teaching marketing & advertising fundamentals and attention grabbing techniques, he finishes the book by saying:

“If you’re not growing, the problem is most likely in your product and not your advertising. Have the guts to change it so that it can evolve into what it deserves to be.”

So before you blame your marketing strategy, take a HARD look at YOUR product or service.

Is it SO good that it’s worth sharing?


***Key Photo credit - Key Photo - itsyourturnblog.com


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Brad Telker
Vice President of Commercial Sales at cfm Distributors, Inc.

Brad joined the cfm team in 2006, and now as the Vice President of Commercial Sales, he focuses on business development, as well as helping contractors and engineers find creative and unique solutions to any size HVAC project. When he’s not at work, Brad enjoys reading, running and spending time with his family.


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