An easy way to measure your success as a salesperson is to calculate how many problems you are solving, and then multiply that number by the size or impact of each problem.

Your Success = The number of problems you solve x the size or impact of each problem. 

Obviously there is no way to calculate a quantifiable answer here, but I think you get the point. 

As a salesperson, you should always be SEEKING problems to fix, not avoiding them. When a customer calls you for help, don’t be annoyed that you have more work to do. Be thankful they called you and not your competitor.

Don’t be annoyed or frustrated when your email inbox is overflowing.

In “The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*uck”, Mark Manson points out that “Problems never stop; they merely get exchanged and/or upgraded.”

 
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If you wish for your inbox to be empty and for no problems to solve, then you will have a newly upgraded problem; you won’t have a job. 

Also notice in the formula that you will be more successful by solving larger, more complex problems for your customers. 

These problems will take more time to solve, and a lot of work and patience. But if you can help your customer be more profitable, increase their revenue, or help them fill a critical position in their company....and you do this often, for all of your customers, you will be very successful. 

The goal should be to solve so many large problems that you have way more business coming in than you can handle. Now you have an upgraded problem (remember, problems never go away, they are either changed or upgraded). 

So next time you feel frustrated or overwhelmed at work, remember....Your Success = The number of problems you solve x the size or impact of each problem. 

Now go share this with someone who complains that they are too busy :-)


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Brad Telker
Vice President, Applied Systems Group at cfm Distributors, Inc.

Brad joined the cfm team in 2006, and now as the Vice President of the Applied Systems Group, he focuses on business development, as well as helping contractors and engineers find creative and unique solutions to any size HVAC project. When he’s not at work, Brad enjoys reading, running and spending time with his family


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